Why Buy A Historic Phoenix Home In The Coronado Historic District?

December 31, 2018 | By Shanna Day

Looking to own a historic home in Phoenix? You might want to buy a historic home in the Coronado Historic District. With smaller home sizes and lot footprints, Coronado Historic offers more bang for the buck when buying a historic Phoenix home. Being 7 to 13 blocks away from the light rail seems to also help keep home values cost-effective in the area, similar to how it was back in the 1920s.

So what's the history behind the Coronado Historic District? It all began when Dwight Heard subdivided 160 acres of land for development. Although considered a rural part of the region, the opening of a new trolley car line on 10th street, Arizona Academy and Good Samaritan Hospital in 1912 plus the relatively low price range for lots between $375,000 and $650,000 helped attract middle income workers to buy land and build homes.

Most construction in the Coronado Historic District occured in the teens and early 1920s, resulting in many homes to be built bungalow style. Some homes though at the time were built in early southwest or English style period revivals.

While the Great Depression in 1929 put a roadblock to the area's development, the era added an interesting detail to many homes: rear yard garages converted into living spaces. Many homeowners at the time opted to rent out the front house and live in the garages. To this day, many still use garages as living spaces.

When development resumed, homes were generally built in a simple ranch style in line with the new Federal Housing Authority's call for simples and more utilitarian homes, paving way to masterplanned communities in Arizona. The rise of the automobile saw most homes having either an attached garage or carport.

So what can one expect to find when searching for historic homes for sale in the Coronado Historic District? With homes averaging only 1200 sqft on .18 acre lots, there's an intimate and cozy feel to the community even though there's a large number of homes. Most homes done bungalow style sport front porches, encouraging homeowners to spend some time sitting outside and socialize with neighbors.

You'll find a lot of creative types like artists, web designers, and architects living here, perhaps drawn by a general pride of ownership in the area that's not quite as formal as other historic districts. A growing number of students from ASU's downtown campus is also being drawn to live in the Coronado Historic as well. Many words can describe what it's like to live in this Phoenix area but perhaps no other description might say it best other than the one you feel or come to mind when you visit and experience Coronado Historic District for yourself.

Want to see any Historic Area homes? Call "The Real Estate Experts" at 480-415-7616!

 

List Of Coronado District Subdivisions

1. Arda Place
2. Bevan Place
3. E. Princeton Heights
4. Edgemere
5. Fowler Tract
6. Governor Square
7. Homeview
8. Homewood Tract
9. Hubble Tract
10. Hurley Heights
11. Jackson Place
12. Keran Place
13. LA Colonia
14. Leas Sub
15. Leper Brown Place
16. Los Olivos Heights
17. Marshall Place
18. Palm Gardens
19. Phoenicia
20. Roycroft
21. Rydberg Place
22. South Princeton
23. Syndicate Place
24. Womack Heights

 



Why Buy A Historic Phoenix Home In The Coronado Historic District? 

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